Our Tie Fabrics: silk twill, saglia, wovens & more

Woven Silk Bow Ties

As the name implies, woven fabrics are created by weaving together silk threads of different colors on a loom. The resulting vibrancy of colors and richness of texture in a woven fabric's design sets these ties a cut above their printed counterpart.

The beauty created by weaving individual strands of silk together may cause some woven fabrics to fray and look "fuzzy" if they come into contact with your beard. Our wovens are chosen for their tight weaves and should not suffer. If, however, your tie shows any signs of fraying, an open flame – we recommend using a barbecue lighter – applied directly above the frayed silk, will "melt" the strands back into the weave (without igniting them) and eliminate the fuzz.

British Woven Silk Bow Ties

As the name implies, woven fabrics are created by weaving together silk threads of different colors on a loom. The resulting vibrancy of colors and richness of texture in a woven fabric's design sets these ties a cut above their printed counterpart.

The beauty created by weaving individual strands of silk together may cause some woven fabrics to fray and look "fuzzy" if they come into contact with your beard. Our wovens are chosen for their tight weaves and should not suffer. If, however, your tie shows any signs of fraying, an open flame – we recommend using a barbecue lighter – applied directly above the frayed silk, will "melt" the strands back into the weave (without igniting them) and eliminate the fuzz.

Silk Twill Ties

Highly regarded for strength and durability, silk twill ties feature a diagonal weave, commonly associated with herringbone and gabardine. Being a dense fabric woven with a double-thread, these ties are easily maintained and especially resistant to soiling.

The designs featured on our twill ties are commonly printed on the fabric — unlike wovens, where the pattern is literally “woven” in to the fabric with different colored threads.

Silk Jacquard Ties

Jacquards feature intricate patterns or designs woven throughout the entirety of the fabric. In the case of formal woven jacquards, the visible texture of fabric (created by raising the warp thread during the weaving process) is the pattern or design of the tie. Other jacquards feature the pattern in the background, with a pattern or pictorial design printed over it. The jacquard weaving process (and the necessary loom attachment) were perfected at the beginning of the 19th century by Frenchman Joseph Marie Jacquard.

King Twill Ties

Like standard silk twill fabrics, king twills are also known for durability. King twill ties feature a ribbed (raised ridge or wale) diagonal weave, typically associated with gabardine and herringbone. Being a dense fabric woven with a double-thread, these ties are resistant to soiling and essentially maintenance-free.

The designs featured on our twill ties are commonly printed on the fabric — unlike wovens, where the pattern is literally “woven” in to the fabric with different colored threads.

Silk Shantung Dupioni Ties

The distinctive “slubs” you see in the fabric of our Indian handwoven silk shantung ties are characteristic of dupioni silk. They are created when double-nested cocoons are harvested, dyed and hand-woven into this naturally textured fabric, which, when made into a tie for you, gives it a unique and subtle beauty, full of rich color.

Grosgrain Ties

A densely woven silk, grosgrain is characterized by its ribs (resulting from a weft that is heavier than the warp) and its relatively “stiff” nature.  As a result it is a fabric that ties extremely well and maintains its shape like almost no other woven silk can.  While commonly available in a wide variety of colors for use as ribbon, black is usually the color used by the apparel industry for formal wear.  Bill’s Private Stock, however, offers grosgrain ties and coordinates in a luscious palette – because “black tie” affairs don’t necessarily require black ties.

Houndstooth Ties

Houndstooth Usually a “duotone” pattern resulting from two different color woolen threads being woven in alternating stripes, the houndstooth check originated in Scotland. The two most common colors are black and white, but a popular variation called Glen plaid, or Glen Urquhart, was popularized by Edward VIII when he was Prince of Wales.

Silk Saglia Ties

Silk Saglia is a a heavy, ribbed silk — the word “saglia” (pronounced sa-LEE-uh) refers to the ribbing. Though the ties are woven, the designs are printed, not woven into the twill.

Ancient Madder Ties

A centuries-old procedure, ancient madder is created by immersing printed silks in vats of cold indigo. The result can be a dusty looking finish with a suede-like texture and slightly uneven solid ground cover.

Woven Neckties

As the name implies, woven fabrics are created by weaving together silk threads of different colors on a loom. The resulting vibrancy of colors and richness of texture in a woven fabric’s design sets these ties a cut above their printed counterpart.

Silk Charmeuse & Silk Crepe

Charmeuse is lustrous satin, while crepe is a soft-finish silk. If you'd prefer your necktie to made with crepe silk, just make a note of your preference in the "Gift Message" during checkout. No extra charge.

Silk Charmeuse

One side of the Charmeuse is lustrous satin; the reverse is soft-finish crepe. Order yours with both sides alike if you wish — just make a note of your preference in the "Gift Message" during checkout. No extra charge.

Silk Piqué Ties

A knitted cotton (or silk) fabric with a waffle, or diamond-shaped pattern. French piqué knits became an international favorite when Rene Lacoste, a 1920s French tennis champion, designed the polo shirt.

Cotton Corduroy Ties

Cotton corduroy was originally woven to be an extremely durable fabric using a high ratio of weft threads to warp threads interrupted by equally spaced ribs, or races, running the length of the cloth. When the races are cut, prior to dyeing, the result is the characteristic wales we now associate with all corduroy fabrics.

Cotton Ties

Cotton is an organic fabric of ancient origin. It is created from the fluffy white fibers that burst from the plant’s bolls after cotton plants bloom. These fibers are picked, cleaned and spun into fine yarn, which is then woven into fabric. Generally, this rough cotton is then bleached and printed before being used to create clothing – or, in our case, cotton Beau Ties.

Two Fabric Ties

Our two-fabric ties are just what you think they are! We use one fabric for the front and a complementary choice for the back. If you tie your own tie, you can choose to feature either fabric, and a little twist here or there as you create your bow can result in several different final looks. A little experimentation will help you decide which one you like best.

Flannel Ties

Originally woven from wool, flannel originated in Wales in the 16th Century, and was the fabric of choice for the working man. It wasn’t until the 19th century, in North America, that cotton was mixed with or substituted for wool and cotton flannel made its debut. Popularized late in the 20th century for clothing other than the ubiquitous plaid flannel shirt, cotton flannel is now appreciated for its soft nap and is used for everything from bedding to – as you see here, neckwear.

French Woven Ties

Silk weaving has deep roots in France – extending back to the 15th Century, when it was at the center of a vibrant era of textile design and production in Europe. Indeed, it was French innovation that led to the development of a loom that would allow the weaving of patterns like jacquard and brocade.

French Woven Ties

Silk weaving flourished in Switzerland in the 12and 13th Century, but faded into obscurity by the early 15th century. When religious prosecution drove many of the talented Huguenot designers and weavers out of France in the mid 17th century, they settled in Switzerland and for almost 300 years, silk played a vital role in the economy of Zurich, in particular. Only a few silk houses now remain in Switzerland.

Wool Cashmere Ties

Strong, light and soft, cashmere is obtained from the Cashmere (Kashmir) goat, and then spun into yarn or thread. When the thread is woven in a plain or twill wear, the resulting fabric is used for all manner of clothing and accessories.

Camel Hair Ties

Naturally golden tan in color, camel hair wool has its source in the soft underbelly coat of the Bactrian (two-hump) camel. The fibers are gathered by hand during the annual molting of the camel's coat, and then spun into fabric well known for its lightness, strength and warmth.